5 Tips for Hosting a Back-To-School Donation Drive

Back-to-school shopping is right around the corner, and teachers are about to feel the financial burden of having to stock their classroom with supplies. Teachers spend an average of $600 on school supplies each year out of their own pocket. Many students come to class without any of the basic supplies they need, and teachers fill that gap.

We think this is a perfect opportunity to engage employees with a fundraising event in your office. Not only can it be a lot of fun for your employees, but you can make a positive impact in your local community.

According to a Gallup study, “fully engaged employees earn their employers an average of 120 percent of their salary in value.” Whether you’re a business owner or a community member, you can help get supplies in the hands of teachers before the start of an all new school year.

If you’re a business owner, here are some tips for hosting a successful fundraising event at your workplace.

1. Showcase specific teachers

People like to see who their donations are helping so they know their hard-earned money is going to those who really need it. You can showcase the teachers in your area in need of funds by using AdoptAClassroom.org’s classroom search tool to gather fundraising profiles.

Find a Classroom

By learning more about the classroom they’re helping, your employees may even be more willing to continue to lend a helping hand even after the back-to-school shopping period.

2. Use social media

Social media is a great way to both advertise your donation drive and promote donating online. Those that can’t make it to your fundraising event can still give funds if there is a link to the donation page.

If you’re a business owner advertising your fundraising event on the company’s social media page, you will show your customers that you’re a giving organization. According to a Business News Daily report, more than 90 percent of consumers would switch to brands that support a good cause, and are more likely to be loyal to socially responsible businesses.

3. Show the impact

Thank you coverHave you or your business given funds to classrooms in the past? If so, show off the impact reports and thank you notes that you’ve received from teachers to your fundraising event attendees. This will prove to potential donors that funding a classroom has a big impact, and that teachers are grateful to receive some much-needed support.

 

 

 

4. Promote shopping

Anyone who shops online with We-Care.com, Amazon Smile, Fashion Project, or Humble Bundle can choose a charity when they make a purchase and a portion of their payment will be donated at no extra cost to the shopper. During your donation drive, tell donors about these websites and inform them that by choosing AdoptAClassroom.org when they make a purchase they can continue to help teachers in need.

5. Offer donation incentives

To attract donors, offer incentives to those that give to the cause you’re supporting. Most employees we know are easily lured by free food. If you offer breakfast or lunch at your fundraising event, you’ll likely attract more employees.

However, if it’s not in the budget to offer costly incentives, you can still find ways to reward your employees’ altruism. Donations could earn employees a casual-dress day in the office.

 

Are you a small business owner looking to support education? Download our small business guide here!

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One Response to “5 Tips for Hosting a Back-To-School Donation Drive”

  1. If you’re a business owner advertising your fundraising event on the company’s social media page, you will show your customers that you’re a giving organization. According to a Business News Daily report, more than 90 percent of consumers would switch to brands that support a good cause, and are more likely to be loyal to socially responsible businesses.togel sgp

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